Wash. Post – The Racial Row That’s Dividing the Democrats

The Racial Row That’s Dividing the Democrats

Clinton Backers’ Remarks Become Issue

By Lois Romano
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, January 15, 2008; C01

Herein lies the irony:

The first seriously viable black presidential candidate has largely avoided discussions of race, while the white candidate whose husband was affectionately called the “first black president” is being assailed by critics for using race as a negative touchstone in the campaign.

Race has always been an uncomfortable but inescapable part of America’s political landscape, but not since the 1960s has it been injected into the presidential campaign so early, so fast and so furiously — and by Democrats using it against each other. The strangeness of it goes even further, with the spectacle of black surrogates being deployed by the Clinton camp to lob criticism at a black presidential candidate. Yesterday, surrogates on both sides continued to wage what some see as a unseemly verbal war, and the invective has polarized opinions on all sides of the issue, as always happens when race and political campaigns mix.
Clinton Backers’ Remarks Become Issue
By Lois Romano
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, January 15, 2008; C01

Herein lies the irony:

The first seriously viable black presidential candidate has largely avoided discussions of race, while the white candidate whose husband was affectionately called the “first black president” is being assailed by critics for using race as a negative touchstone in the campaign.

Race has always been an uncomfortable but inescapable part of America’s political landscape, but not since the 1960s has it been injected into the presidential campaign so early, so fast and so furiously — and by Democrats using it against each other. The strangeness of it goes even further, with the spectacle of black surrogates being deployed by the Clinton camp to lob criticism at a black presidential candidate. Yesterday, surrogates on both sides continued to wage what some see as a unseemly verbal war, and the invective has polarized opinions on all sides of the issue, as always happens when race and political campaigns mix.

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