Archive for January 2008

NYT – Ethnic Press Covers the Race With Gusto

January 31, 2008

new york, new jersey, connecticut

Will Senator Edward M. Kennedy’s endorsement of Senator Barack Obama sway Irish-Americans? What about The Irish Voice’s endorsement of Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton? Could Mr. Obama become a household name among Chinese-American voters? Will American relations with Russia and Pakistan affect immigrant voters here? And can any Republican contender distance himself from Bush administration policies in the eyes of Arab-Americans?
These questions have not figured high — or figured at all — on televised debates and in the mainstream media coverage of the 2008 presidential campaign. But they are being asked in New York City, which is not only a media capital, but also the ethnic media capital, host to about 200 periodicals and broadcast outlets in dozens of languages — including Bengali, Tagalog, Dari, Latvian, Yiddish, Malayalam and Hungarian.

These ethnic media outlets have been intensely attentive to the presidential competition, not only because it is the most competitive presidential race in decades, but also because American foreign policy and immigration reform are also headline issues that resonate with their audiences. With an eye cast here and another overseas, a group of ethnic media reporters participated in a radio project called Feet in Two Worlds and went to New Hampshire last month to cover the primaries. City Room interviewed five of those journalists ­ as well as other ethnic media journalists on how the campaign is being covered in their communities.

Perhaps the most impressive effort is being put out by the Spanish-language ImpreMedia chain, which was freshly formed during the last campaign cycle from a merger and now expanded to a combined circulation of 10 million weekly. This election cycle, the media chain is embedding six reporters with various campaigns, covering Super Tuesday from seven battleground states, and doing its own extensive polling of Hispanic voters.

NYT – Obama’s $32 Million Haul

January 31, 2008

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Barack Obama campaigned at Los Angeles Trade Technical College in East Los Angeles. (Photo: Damon Winter/The New York Times)

LOS ANGELES – A $32 million month.

That’s how much Senator Barack Obama has raised so far in January, according to his campaign manager, David Plouffe, who announced the first fund-raising tally of 2008. The campaign attracted 170,000 new contributors during the month, he said.

“Obviously this contest could go on for some time in the primary,’’ Mr. Plouffe said, speaking to reporters on a conference call earlier this morning. “We think the strength of our financial position and the number of donors does speak to financial sustainability.”

“If this ends up going through March and April, we think we’re going to have the resources necessary to conduct vigorous campaigns in every state to come.”

In 2008, presidential campaigns are required to report their fund-raising totals every month. The official filing with the Federal Election Commission will come in February, but the Obama campaign was eager to preview their $32 million figure today.

Since Mr. Obama began his presidential bid a year ago, the campaign has signed up 650,000 contributors, many of whom are contributing far below the $2,300 maximum limit and are able to donate again and again.

Mr. Plouffe noted that many of the contributors also play another role: campaign volunteers in the 22 states holding contests on Feb. 5 and in the string of states to follow.

“Their financial support is obviously very, very important, but just as important is the volunteer support that they give us in these states,” Mr. Plouffe said. “We think we do have a decided advantage over Senator Clinton in terms of the amount of voter contact that we’re doing.”

The campaign is spending record sums of money, too.

In addition to the advertisements already airing in the Super Tuesday states, Mr. Plouffe announced that commercials will begin airing tomorrow in Louisiana, Washington state and Nebraska, the next round of contests on Feb. 9, as well as Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia, where voters weigh in on Feb. 12.

ColorsNW – Asian Pacific Americans for Hillary Clinton, house party

January 22, 2008

Several dozen local Asian American leaders gathered on Jan. 16 at the home of Grace Yuan to show their support of the Sen. Hillary Clinton’s race for the presidency. – Photo by Naomi Ishisaka, ColorsNW.

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Grace Yuan, center, hosts a gathering to support Sen. Hillary Clinton’s race for the presidency. Port Commissioner Lloyd Hara is on the right.

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Commission on Asian American Affairs Commissioner Habib Habib with Albert Shen.

ColorsNW – Washington for Obama Campaign Office Opening

January 22, 2008

Photos from the opening of the Washington for Obama Grassroots Campaign Office Opening on Jan. 12. The opening was so packed, several people had to leave to make room for others. The campaign office is located at 614 1st Avenue in Pioneer Square. – Photos by Naomi Ishisaka, ColorsNW

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Wash. Post – The Racial Row That’s Dividing the Democrats

January 16, 2008

The Racial Row That’s Dividing the Democrats

Clinton Backers’ Remarks Become Issue

By Lois Romano
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, January 15, 2008; C01

Herein lies the irony:

The first seriously viable black presidential candidate has largely avoided discussions of race, while the white candidate whose husband was affectionately called the “first black president” is being assailed by critics for using race as a negative touchstone in the campaign.

Race has always been an uncomfortable but inescapable part of America’s political landscape, but not since the 1960s has it been injected into the presidential campaign so early, so fast and so furiously — and by Democrats using it against each other. The strangeness of it goes even further, with the spectacle of black surrogates being deployed by the Clinton camp to lob criticism at a black presidential candidate. Yesterday, surrogates on both sides continued to wage what some see as a unseemly verbal war, and the invective has polarized opinions on all sides of the issue, as always happens when race and political campaigns mix.
Clinton Backers’ Remarks Become Issue
By Lois Romano
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, January 15, 2008; C01

Herein lies the irony:

The first seriously viable black presidential candidate has largely avoided discussions of race, while the white candidate whose husband was affectionately called the “first black president” is being assailed by critics for using race as a negative touchstone in the campaign.

Race has always been an uncomfortable but inescapable part of America’s political landscape, but not since the 1960s has it been injected into the presidential campaign so early, so fast and so furiously — and by Democrats using it against each other. The strangeness of it goes even further, with the spectacle of black surrogates being deployed by the Clinton camp to lob criticism at a black presidential candidate. Yesterday, surrogates on both sides continued to wage what some see as a unseemly verbal war, and the invective has polarized opinions on all sides of the issue, as always happens when race and political campaigns mix.

P-I – Gangs taking more Seattle kids

January 16, 2008

Gangs taking more Seattle kids

Even as teens die, grade-schoolers eager to join

By CLAUDIA ROWE, SCOTT GUTIERREZ AND HECTOR CASTRO
P-I REPORTERS

Trying to reach teenagers increasingly exposed to gun violence and attracted to gang life, a motivational speaker recently met with the 600-member student body at Cleveland High School and threw down the gauntlet. It came in the form of a rope stretched across the floor.

“Stand on the line if you are not being raised by your mother or father,” said Brenda Caldwell, as many youths stepped forward. Stand on the line if you have experienced emotional or physical abuse. Stand on the line if you are holding anger or unable to forgive.

“They flooded the gym floor,” said Caldwell, a Tennessee-based counselor who works in schools, giving lectures to youth around the country. “There was no talking, no speaking, but the message in Seattle was loud and clear.”

P-I – Democrats conciliatory in debates

January 16, 2008

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/connelly/347551_joel16.html

Democrats conciliatory in debatesWednesday, January 16, 2008
Last updated 12:11 a.m. PT

By JOEL CONNELLY
P-I COLUMNIST

LAS VEGAS — She was first in line to watch Democrats’ “winning in the West” presidential debate. Marilyn Gross wanted to hear about such Western topics as recent huge forest fires, water conservation, climate change and urban growth in a region of wide-open spaces but exploding population centers.

She would hear almost nothing about these issues.

Instead, NBC News anchors tried to rekindle a political brushfire by dwelling on racial innuendoes recently traded between backers of Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. They used quotes from The New York Times and one anchor even misstated the name of where the debate was being held.

Ex-Sen. John Edwards made his first Silver State appearance of the year. The state’s precinct caucuses on Saturday will anoint a front-runner in the Democrats’ exciting presidential nominating battle. But Edwards pulled his staff out of Nevada months ago in favor of a big Iowa effort.